Last edited by Dajora
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of rat, the catte and Lovell, our dogge" found in the catalog.

rat, the catte and Lovell, our dogge"

John P. Carr

rat, the catte and Lovell, our dogge"

an example of revision in the Quarto and Folio texts of Richard III?.

by John P. Carr

  • 211 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published .
Written in


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.A.)--In Shakespeare Studies, Univ. of Birmingham, 1987.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21703768M

Hastings' line "The cat, the rat/And Lovell the dog/Rule all England under the hog" was written in by a man named William Collingbourne (or Collingborn). The original spelling was "The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.". SIR RICHARD RADCLIFFE or RATCLIFFE (d. ), adviser of Richard III, was a younger son of Sir Thomas latter's father was younger son of the Clitheroe branch of the Radcliffes of Radcliffe Tower, Lancashire, and himself became Lord of Derwentwater and Keswick, through his marriage, about , to the daughter and heiress of John de Derwentwater. 1 Richard's mother was Margaret.

FORD MADOXFORD AND THE YOUNG LOVELL The Rat, the Catte and Lovell our dogge Rule all England under the hogge.7 After Richard's death at Bosworth Field, Lovell (his crest was a silver dog) was involved in both an attempt to seize Henry VII as the new king proceeded through the north in the spring of and the. Lovell helped in the suppression of Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham ’s rebellion (), and as one of Richard’s most trusted ministers was gibbeted in Collingbourne’s couplet with William Catesby and Richard Ratcliffe::The catte, the ratte and Lovell our dogge:Rulyth all England under a hogge.

'The Catte, the Ratte, and Lovell our dogge Rulyth all England under a Hog' Who was the Hog? Richard III {5} 5. Which of Henry VIII's wives died during or immediately following childbirth? Jane Seymour {6}, Catherine Parr {1}. Catherine Parr married . The Catte and the Ratte refer to two men; Sir William Ratcliffe and Sir William Catsby respectively, who were associated with King Richard III, whose badge was a white boar or a hog. “Lovell our Dogge” refers to Sir Francis Lovell, who was an ally and close friend of the king.


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Rat, the catte and Lovell, our dogge" by John P. Carr Download PDF EPUB FB2

Francis, Viscount Lovell is perhaps best remembered as the Dogge in the rhyme against Richard III ‘The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.’ As Schindler freely admits, part of the reason he is best known for appearing in this verse is because he left very little mark on the historical record otherwise/5(8).

‘The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.’ That cat was Sir William Catesby, one of Richard III’s principal councillors and Chancellor of the Exchequer, executed after the Battle of Bosworth.

The rat was Sir Richard Ratcliffe, who fought with Richard during the Scottish campaigns. In July Tudor agent William Collingbourne - executed for treason in - tacked up a lampoon to the walls of St Paul's Cathedral: 'The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.' That cat was Sir William Catesby, one.

Francis Lovell, 9th Baron Lovell, 6th Baron Holand, later 1st Viscount Lovell KG ( – probably ) was an English nobleman who was an ally of King Richard III during the War of the William Catesby, The catte and Lovell Richard Ratcliffe and he were among Richard's closest supporters, famously called "the Cat, the Rat and Lovell our dog" in an anti-Ricardian squib.

In July Tudor agent William Collingbourne - executed for treason in - tacked up a lampoon to the walls of St Paul's Cathedral: 'The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.'Author: Michele Schindler. Get FREE shipping on Lovell our Dogge by Michele Schindler, from In July Tudor agent William Collingbourne tacked up a lampoon to the walls of St Paul's Cathedral:?The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a.

Reviews, news, and book related articles. our dogge book Friday, August 9, Lovell our Dogge by Michèle Schindler. ‘The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.’ executed after the Battle of Bosworth.

The rat was Sir Richard Ratcliffe, who fought with Richard during the Scottish campaigns. The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.

Ratcliffe had married Agnes Scrope, daughter of Henry Scrope, 4th Baron Scrope of Bolton, one of the great barons in the north of England. The "Catte" above refers to William Catesby. The "dogge" here refers to a Lovell family heraldic symbol.

Lovell our Dogge by Michele Schindler,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Lovell our Dogge: Michele Schindler: We use cookies to give you the best possible experience.

As William Colyngbourne’s rhyme, “The Cat, the Rat and Lovel our Dog / Doe rule all England under a Hog,” suggests, Catesby and Ratcliffe are historically identified as two of Richard’s primary evil-henchmen. [1] Both figures historically had very successful. It read: ‘The Cat, the Rat and Lovell our dog, Rule all England under a Hog.’ The verse was a slight on Richard (the hog, whose badge was a white boar) and his leading counsellors William Catesby (the cat), Sir Richard Ratcliffe (the rat) and Francis, Viscount Lovell (the dog – his heraldic crest featured a wolf).

In July Tudor agent William Collingbourne tacked up a lampoon to the walls of St Paul’s Cathedral:‘The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.’That cat was Sir William Catesby, one of Richard III’s principal councillors and Chancellor of the Exchequer, executed after the Battle of Bosworth.

The Catte and the Ratte refer to two men; Sir William Ratcliffe and Sir William Catsby respectively, who were associated with King Richard III, whose badge was a white boar or a hog.

“Lovell our Dogge” refers to Sir Francis Lovell, who was an ally and close friend of the king. The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge. That cat was Sir William Catesby, one of Richard III s principal councillors and Chancellor of the Exchequer, executed after the Battle of Bosworth.

The rat was Sir William Ratcliffe, knighted by Richard during the Scottish s: 8. Catesby is immortalised as the Catte in the contemporary ditty written by Colingbourne “The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge.” Also in the ditty is another man who grew up with Richard – Lord Francis Lovell and is family seat was also in Northants at Titmarsh.

Lovell's nickname came from his badge, a Talbot hound; the rat was Sir Richard Ratcliffe, the cat Sir William Catesby, and Richard III was named after his badge, the boar.

“The catte, the ratte and Lovell our dogge Rulyth all England under a hogge.” He had command of the fleet which was to have stopped Henry Tudor's landing inbut fought for Richard at Bosworth and after the battle fled to sanctuary at Colchester.

The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge William Collingbourne was one of the opponents of England’s King Richard III. In he pinned these words to the door of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London to mock Richard and three of his closest followers, Richard Ratcliffe, William Catesby and Francis Lovell: ‘The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our.

Cat, the Rat [Ratcliffe], and Lovell our dog, Ruleth all England under a Hog." refers to Catesby as the Cat. Robert Catesby was chief architect of the Gunpowder Plot, a scheme to blow up and destroy the throne of King James I.

Guy Fawkes was one of the conspirators and today England still celebrates Guy Fawkes Day. The Cat, the Rat and Lovel our Dog Doe rule all England under a Hog This demonstrates the fifteenth century fondness for identifying people by puns on their names or by using their heraldic crests or badges (Lovel’s crest was a silver wolf-dog and of course the hog is.

* “ The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all Englande under a hogge. ” The poem was interpolated into Laurence Olivier's film Richard III, a screen adaptation of William Shakespeare's play. In JuneLovell was appointed to guard the south coast to. "The Catte, the Ratte and Lovell our dogge rulyth all England under a hogge" So ran the lampoon pinned to the door of St.

Paul's cathedral in July It was a .The cat, the rat, and Lovell the dog, rule all England under the hog Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs Author(s): John SimpsonJohn Simpson, Jennifer SpeakeJennifer Speake. The allusion is explained in quot. R.

Fabyan New Chronicles of England & France viii.